Australian newspaper: H.T. allows customers to buy land in Scotland and become a Lord or Lady

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AS a child, I was fairly determined to marry Prince William and end my life as a lowly commoner.
Alas, that ship has sailed- but I have still managed to join the nobility.
Buying a noble title is way easier that marrying this guy. Photo by Arthur Edwards - WPA
Buying a noble title is way easier that marrying this guy. Picture: Getty
Last week I bought myself a Highland Title, which means I am now Lady Alexis Carey, the proud owner of a plot of land in Scotland’s Glencoe Wood.
Highland Titles allows customers to purchase a souvenir plot of land on a Scottish Highland estate, which legally allows owners to use the courtesy title of laird (landowner), lord or lady.
Croydon’s Scottish Accessories Shoppe sells Highland Titles, and plots range in size from one to 1000 square feet while prices start at a mere $50.
While the titles are firmly tongue in cheek and a novelty gift for “the person who has everything”, money also goes towards important conservation work.
Scottish Accessories Shoppe owner Stephen Brine said customers had embraced the fun concept.
“It is a good giggle with a green message,” he said.
Highland Titles sales and marketing director Stephen Rossiter, who is visiting Australia from the UK for the Bundanoon Show and the Ballarat Pipe Band Championship, said the popularity of Highland Titles in Australia was cemented when comedian Julia Morris bought one and incorporated it into her comedy routine.
Highland Titles allows buyers to become a Scottish Lord or Lady. Picture: Craig Wilson
Highland Titles allows buyers to become a Scottish Lord or Lady. Picture: Craig Wilson
Highland Titles sales and marketing director Stephen Rossiter with journalist Alexis Care
Highland Titles sales and marketing director Stephen Rossiter with journalist Alexis Carey. Picture: Craig Wilson
He said it was “a bit of fun” and a chance to help Scotland’s wilderness.
“The whole idea is to raise money for conservation. When you own land in Scotland you are called a laird, and our tongue-in-cheek translation is that you become a lord or lady of Glencoe,” he said.
“It is important to emphasise that this is a courtesy title- you can’t arrive in Heathrow and demand to meet the Queen, but it is a little bit of fun.
“You will not be a lord or lady in the hereditary sense but you can legally change your name and we provide the certificate and the deed. It is difficult to get your title on your passport or drivers licence as they don’t tend to carry titles, but the majority of people change their bank details and credit cards to say lord or lady. It is a good way to score hotel or flight upgrades.”
(L-R) Stephen Brine and Highland Titles sales and marketing director Stephen Rossiter at
(L-R) Stephen Brine and Highland Titles sales and marketing director Stephen Rossiter at Croydon’s Scottish Accessories Shoppe. Picture: Craig Wilson
Customers can travel to Scotland and visit their plot, and are free to plant trees, flowers or flags or scatter ashes within it.
One owner has even placed a Lego castle on his land- the closest most of us will come to joining the aristocracy.